Stem Cells To Cure Sickle Cell

Ten years ago, wed just tell them, sorry you have no family member. We cant transplant you, Shalini Shenoy, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Medical Director, Pediatric Stem Cell Transplant Program, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis Children’s Hospital, told Ivanhoe. Dr. Shalini Shenoy is studying a new option for patients without related donors.
To read the source source including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.texomashomepage.com/story/stem-cells-to-cure-sickle-cell/d/story/f_7ZysPyOkqHjYxuOEJobw

Anemia of Inflammation

In the past, it was believed that anemia of inflammation was associated only with infections such as syphilis and tuberculosis. Over the last 30 years, connections between the condition and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, connective tissue disorders, chronic infection, trauma, or cancer have also been established. Causes of Anemia of Inflammation Although the exact cause of anemia of inflammation is not known, it is related to the effects of chronic inflammatory diseases on the red blood cells. These conditions cause a number of changes in the body’s red blood cells. The lifespan of red blood cells becomes shorter, production of new red blood cells in the bone marrow slows down, and iron is “withheld” so that it cannot be used to make new red blood cells.
To read the source article please go to the following url – http://chealth.canoe.ca/channel_condition_info_details.asp?disease_id=263&channel_id=1021&relation_id=111252

Anemia is a sign that the body is not producing enough red blood cells

In the lab, anemia can be measured in three ways: by actually counting the red cells, by measuring the amount of hemoglobin in the blood serum, and by noting the hematocrit, or what percentage of the blood is made up of cells. Though there are hundreds of causes, there are only three pathways by which anemia can develop. One is a problem in the bone marrow that impairs production of red blood cells. The second is a problem, called hemolysis, that shortens the life span of red blood cells. The third is a problem that leads to the loss of red blood cells from the body, of which the most obvious and common is blood loss.
Original: Anemia is a sign that the body is not producing enough red blood cells

Strong results reported in trial of treatment for iron deficiency anemia in IBD patients

The results reflect an important milestone in the development of ST10 as the only effective, low-dose oral iron-replacement therapy without the significant GI side effects of ferrous iron or the high risks associated with intravenous administration of iron, Carl Sterritt, Shield Therapeutics founder and CEO, said in a company news release . ST10 presents a significant opportunity for Shield to develop a paradigm-changing treatment that will address a broad range of indications with a strong commercial potential, and we look forward to rapidly advancing the program. The randomized, multicenter study analyzed 128 patients with anemia secondary to Crohns disease or ulcerative colitis who had demonstrated intolerance or inadequate response from previous oral ferrous products. Patients were given either Shields ST10 candidate or placebo. After 12 weeks, patients receiving the treatment demonstrated a mean improvement in hemoglobin levels of 2.3 g/dL (P<.0001), and more than 65% of patients experienced normalized hemoglobin levels, the release said. Significant improvements in hemoglobin levels also were demonstrated at week 4 (1.1 g/dL, P<.0001) and at 8 weeks (1.8 g/dL, P<.0001). Adverse events were similar between the placebo and therapy arms, the release said. Full findings will be presented at a future scientific meeting.
To read the source version including any supplementary images or video, see here Strong results reported in trial of treatment for iron deficiency anemia in IBD patients

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s