Metabolic Syndrome Continues To Climb In The U.s.

Gary Liguori, an assistant professor of health, nutrition and exercise sciences at North Dakota State University in Fargo. The new study found that 34 percent of U.S. adults in government health surveys conducted between 1999 and 2006 had metabolic syndrome — up from 29 percent in similar surveys done between 1988 and 1994. The researchers estimate that about 50 million U.S. adults had metabolic syndrome in 1990 and 64 million had it in 2000. The number of Americans with metabolic syndrome between 1999 and 2006 was probably about 68 million, according to the researchers. In general, the researchers found, the rise in metabolic syndrome was primarily due to growing rates of abdominal obesity and high blood pressure.
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Family Health Matters: Metabolic syndrome: Are you at risk?

Although cigarette smoking is not a risk factor for developing diabetes, it is a risk factor for developing high blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, heart disease, and metabolic syndrome. Limit alcohol consumption. A study of more than 1,500 people found that men who drank more than two drinks a day and women who drank more than one alcoholic drink per day had an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Excess alcohol consumption can lead to weight gain, high blood pressure, and high triglycerides, all key components of metabolic syndrome. Sleep seven to eight hours a night. Although the relationship between daily amount of sleep and metabolic syndrome is not yet fully understood, a study of 1,214 adults found that metabolic syndrome was more likely to occur in those who slept fewer than seven hours or more than eight hours a night.
Original – Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

Metabolic Syndrome: How Much Exercise?

Although the pro-inflammatory proteins associated with obesity may cause damage to the heart, blood vessels and insulin function in adults, in this group of young children, they appear to be helpful. The researchers pose a number of explanations for their findings. Normal growth may temporarily increase inflammation, and the presence of the inflammatory biomarkers may actually preserve glucose stability. It may also be that the presence of an existing inflammatory environment is crucial for defending the body against infection, allergies, and other insults prior to puberty. Also, both metabolism and inflammation are affected by physical activity, which is higher in young, healthy children as opposed to adults. “The chronic nature of this inflammatory environment, while beneficial during developmental stages, may, however, lead to undesirable immune responses associated with disease later in life,” says lead author Jovanny Zabaleta, PhD, Assistant Professor-Research in the Department of Pediatrics and the Stanley S.
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Metabolic Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

An overview of metabolic syndrome Metabolic refers to the bodys normal biochemical functioning. Metabolic syndrome comprises five risk factors which raise the risk for developing coronary heart disease and other health issues, such as diabetes and stroke. These include: Abdominal obesity — excess fat in the stomach causing a large waistline High triglyceride levels or taking medicine to treat high triglycerides Low HDL (AKA good cholesterol) levels or taking medicine to treat low HDL levels High blood pressure or taking medicine to treat high blood pressure High fasting blood sugar or taking medicine to treat high blood sugar People suffering from even slightly elevated levels of at least three of these five metabolic risk factors may develop metabolic syndrome. Each additional metabolic risk factor further increases your likelihood of experiencing heart disease, diabetes or stroke; conversely, reducing your risk factors decreases your chances. An increasingly prevalent condition Approximately 32 percent of U.S.
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Pro-inflammatory proteins linked to obesity, metabolic syndrome in adults appear to protect young children

Continue Other Videos From Health News Wires > Related Health News Wires Metabolic Syndrome: Understanding The Condition Metabolic Syndrome: Understanding The Condition Rick Porter October 09, 2013 Font size: + – Click Here Metabolic syndrome is a perplexing and concerning collection of threatening elements that considerably increase the threat of heart disease and even early death; a lot more compared to any one danger factor alone. Metabolic syndrome is a perplexing and concerning collection of threatening elements that considerably increase the threat of heart disease and even early death; a lot more compared to any one danger factor alone. The American Heart Association estimates that nearly 35 % of Americans are thought to have metabolic syndrome , severely increasing the possibilities of insulin resistance, heart problem, diabetic issues, stroke and other health conditions. There are many factors adding to the advancement of metabolic syndrome, the major factors leading to metabolic syndrome are genetic makeup, lack of exercising, inadequate diet, fluctuating blood sugar and insulin level and carrying excess weight. Taking into consideration the multitude of different symptoms and threat factors leading to metabolic syndrome, figuring out the problem can be tricky. Common indicators considered to diagnose metabolic syndrome typically include increased waist size, raised blood glucose level degrees, high triglyceride degrees, and high cholesterol and blood pressure.
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Metabolic Syndrome: Understanding The Condition

Low amounts of vigorous exercise didn’t curb metabolic syndrome overall. But it did improve certain risk factors, such as waist size. Why the difference between low amounts of vigorous exercise and low amounts of moderate exercise? The reasons aren’t clear. But consistency may have mattered — Johnson says it took more exercise sessions to meet the assigned benchmark with moderate effort than with vigorous effort. As for the people who were assigned to stick to their sedentary lifestyles, “they got unbelievably worse in those six months,” says Johnson.
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